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 How to open the .cxt file? 

Last post Thu, Aug 12 2010 2:40 AM by Andrew Beckett. 3 replies.
Started by Renee 09 Aug 2010 08:47 PM. Topic has 3 replies and 5530 views
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  • Mon, Aug 9 2010 8:47 PM

    • Renee
    • Top 150 Contributor
    • Joined on Thu, Jul 31 2008
    • Posts 57
    • Points 975
    How to open the .cxt file? Reply

    Hi,

     How can I open the .cxt file to read?  How can I produce a .cxt file?

    Thank you very much!

    Filed under:
    • Post Points: 20
  • Tue, Aug 10 2010 12:55 AM

    Re: How to open the .cxt file? Reply

    You can't read the contents of the .cxt (well, you can read it, but you probably can't understand it!). It's a binary file, which is an incremental snapshot of the SKILL virtual machine; in effect it's the compiled virtual machine code for the SKILL it contains.

    As for creating them yourself, this is covered in the SKILL Language User Guide. Look at this in cdnshelp (or cdsdoc in older releases), or just open <ICinstDir>/doc/sklanguser/sklanguser.pdf and look at the chapter "Delivering Products" (chapter 10 in IC5141).

    Regards,

    Andrew.

    • Post Points: 20
  • Wed, Aug 11 2010 6:19 PM

    • Renee
    • Top 150 Contributor
    • Joined on Thu, Jul 31 2008
    • Posts 57
    • Points 975
    Re: How to open the .cxt file? Reply

    Is it possible to re-compile this .cxt file so that it can be both read and understood?

     Thanks!

    • Post Points: 20
  • Thu, Aug 12 2010 2:40 AM

    Re: How to open the .cxt file? Reply

    The simple answer is "no". It's possible that you might be able to use pp() to decompile a function in a context file if the context file was not created with write protection turned on (which results in read protection via pp for functions in context files as well), but in general the reason people create contexts is:

    1. It's faster to load because all the code is precompiled
    2. There are fewer files to manage
    3. They don't want their code visible - so it effectively provides encryption

    If you want to look at the source of a context file, you should ask the supplier of that context. Quite likely they don't want you to see the code though because it's their IP.

    Regards,

    Andrew.

    • Post Points: 5
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Started by Renee at 09 Aug 2010 08:47 PM. Topic has 3 replies.