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Jim Newton



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SKILL for the Skilled: SKILL++ hi App Forms
One way to learn how to use the SKILL++ Object System is by extending an application which already exists. Once you understand how extension by inheritance works, it will be easier to implement SKILL++ applications from the ground up. I.e., if you understand   Read More »
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SKILL for the Skilled: Simple Testing Macros
In this post I want to look at an easy way to write simple self-testing code. This includes using the SKILL built-in assert macro and a few other macros which you can derive from it. The assert macro This new macro, assert , was added to SKILL in SKILL   Read More »
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SKILL for the Skilled: How to Shuffle a List
The previous post of SKILL for the Skilled presented some ways to systematically visit all permutations of a list. As noted, the time to iterate through all permutations of a large list is prohibitive. If the goal is to find a permutation that meets some   Read More »
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SKILL for the Skilled: Visiting All Permutations
In this posting I want to look at several ways of generating permutations of a list. The problem comes up occasionally in fault analysis as well as a few other applications. Don't generate the list It is usually a bad idea to try to generate a list   Read More »
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SKILL for the Skilled: How to Copy a Hash Table
In this posting I want to look at ways to copy a hash table in SKILL. There are several ways you might naively try to do this, but some of these naive approaches have gotchas which you should be aware of. In the following paragraphs several inferior functions   Read More »
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SKILL for the Skilled: The Partial Predicate Problem
The partial predicate problem describes the type of problem encountered when a function needs to usually return a computed value, but also may need to return a special value indicating that the computation failed. Specifically, the problem arises if the   Read More »
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SKILL for the Skilled: Part 9, Many Ways to Sum a List
In the previous postings of SKILL for the Skilled , we've looked at different ways to sum the elements of a list of numbers. In this posting, we'll look at at least one way to NOT sum a list. In my most recent posting , the particular subject   Read More »
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SKILL for the Skilled: Part 8, Many Ways to Sum a List (Closures -- Functions with State)
In the past several postings to this blog, we've looked at various ways to sum a given list of numbers. In this posting I'll present yet another way to do this. This time the technique will be markedly different than the previous ways, and will   Read More »
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SKILL for the Skilled: Part 7, Many Ways to Sum a List
In this episode of SKILL for the Skilled I'll introduce a feature of the let primitive that Scheme programmers will find familiar, but other readers may have never seen before. The feature is called named let , and I'll show you how to use it   Read More »
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SKILL for the Skilled: Part 6, Many Ways to Sum a List
In a previous post I presented sumlist_2b as a function that would sum lists of length 0, 1, or more. (defun sumlist_2b (numbers) (apply plus 0 0 numbers)) Unfortunately sumlist_2b cannot handle extremely long lists. In this posting, I will introduce   Read More »
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