Home > Community > Forums > Custom IC Design > current measure on gnd! global .

Email

* Required Fields

Recipients email * (separate multiple addresses with commas)

Your name *

Your email *

Message *

Contact Us

* Required Fields
First Name *

Last Name *

Email *

Company / Institution *

Comments: *

 current measure on gnd! global . 

Last post Mon, Apr 19 2010 7:49 PM by Andrew Beckett. 3 replies.
Started by Mike G 15 Apr 2010 08:24 PM. Topic has 3 replies and 2777 views
Page 1 of 1 (4 items)
Sort Posts:
  • Thu, Apr 15 2010 8:24 PM

    • Mike G
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on Wed, Feb 3 2010
    • Posts 2
    • Points 40
    current measure on gnd! global . Reply

    Hi,

    How can i measure total gnd current, the gnd is global net ?

    thanks  

    Filed under:
    • Post Points: 20
  • Fri, Apr 16 2010 1:06 PM

    Re: current measure on gnd! global . Reply

    Measuring current on a node is meaningless. You have to measure current through a branch, and so there needs to be a point at which you can probe the current. Often this would be through your supply source. Of course, if  you have multiple supplies and want to measure the total ground return current, you'd have to sum up all the currents in each, or better still don't have a global ground, and insert an iprobe or zero-volt source in series with the ground pin before it connects to all the supply sources.

    Regards,

    Andrew.

    • Post Points: 20
  • Sun, Apr 18 2010 11:02 AM

    • Mike G
    • Not Ranked
    • Joined on Wed, Feb 3 2010
    • Posts 2
    • Points 40
    Re: current measure on gnd! global . Reply

    Hi Andrew,

    Thanks for the answer .

    Actually i have large design of SRAM's , and i can't sum all current thru hierarchy, and i can't change the name of the net.

    Do you know any way to get the current of the chip thru gnd! ?

    Filed under:
    • Post Points: 20
  • Mon, Apr 19 2010 7:49 PM

    Re: current measure on gnd! global . Reply

    Yes. As I mentioned, sum up the currents through the various supply sources connected to ground. I presume you don't have too many sources (or at least they're not scattered throughout the hierarchy), so presumably you could isolate those reasonably easily? You could always connect all your sources to a common node, and then connect that node to gnd! via an iprobe or zero-volt source - that way you've got just a single source to measure the current through, and don't have to sum up anything.

    Regards,

    Andrew.

    • Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 1 (4 items)
Sort Posts:
Started by Mike G at 15 Apr 2010 08:24 PM. Topic has 3 replies.